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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
like you also thought the civil rights movement for african-americans took the opportunity of the franchise to run for office. if you don't like those laws, you become a lawmaker. >> become part of the solution. i think that's -- i want to just say about president obama, he's one of the reasons that people are so mobilized by himment you can identify with him on multiple levels. i like to think of president obama as an immigrant. certainly a child of an immigrant. there are multiple levels at which you can identify with that and it gave people his election also mobilized a lot of different folks to feel that something was possible. >> certainly a cosmopolitan citizen having lived in schools, indonesia, a half sister who was indonesian. as well as american like. that idea of a cosmopolitan person is part what the immigrant story is. grace, i wish you great luck in your campaign. thank you, sayu, robert and chloe are back for me. next we're talking about affirmative action. jack, you're a little boring. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the cit
when the rising tide with the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of people might age were heading down to mississippi to break the back of segregation in. i was living in cambridge at the time. this was the 1960's. a volkswagen bug. i drove across town into the black community. i was never there before. although i had grown up just outside of boston. a revered figure of the black community both the associative doctor came and i asked him may i be of use? he said yes, young man. you can. i am glad you came here to talk with me in your own home town. you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice. you can find the struggle here. come into our schools to help our children. i walked into the headquarters and said i will be a teacher. and had never heard of certification. [laughter] i knew nothing about teaching. they did not teach you anything useful at harvard. they still don't. [laughter] the first day i taught they sent me to teach kindergarten. the first time i ever taught in my life. i was terrified. i had no idea what you do with people that size. they we
in the summer that year when the rising tide in the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of young people my age or heading to mississippi to try to break the back of segregation in the south. i was living in cambridge at the time. one day i simply got in my car. this was the 1916s. it was a little par. and i drove across town into the black community. i had never been in the black community before although i had grown up just outside of boston and i went to a minister, a wonderful man, some of you may recall his name. a revered figure in the black community and some close associate of dr. king and i asked him simply may i be of use? and he said yes, young man, you can. and he said i am glad you are here to talk to me in your own home town because you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice in america. he said you can join the struggle here. come into schools and try to help our children. i walked into the headquarters of boston public school and said i am going to be a teacher. i had never heard of certification. i knew nothing about teaching. didn't teach anyth
in florida but around the country? and all of the fingers kept pointing back to alec. >> when civil rights and grassroots groups learned about alec's connection to stand your ground laws, they were outraged. >> alec doesn't do its work alone, they do it with some of the biggest corporate brands in america. >> before long, corporations were pulling out of alec, including coca-cola, kraft foods, mcdonald's, marsproctor & gamble, johnson & johnson. caught in the glare of the national spotlight, alec tried to change the subject. >> you know, i think the entire debate needs to be reframed, and really what alec is, is a bipartisan association of state legislators -- we have legislators of all political stripes coming together to talk about the most critical issues facing the states and trying to come up with the best solutions to face some of the problems that we're having. >> alright, so your point is it's not a partisan organization. >> but alec is partisan. and then some. >> in the spring i got a call from a person who said that all of the alec bills were available and was i interested in loo
for anybody who studies his history and what he's done for this country, both as a veteran and as a civil rights leader but that's beside the point. the point is that this tape, for the most part, is much ado about nothing. but the republican sometimes can be pretty good at making something out of nothing. so it will be interesting to see how people react. >> gloria, what do you make of it? >> i just think that if you are disposed not to like president obama and you think that jeremiah wright ought to be relitigated, which i don't, that you are going to look at this and go oh, yeah, yeah, okay, yeah, jeremiah wright. that was something that was discussed in the last campaign and for better or worse, let me disagree with eric here. i believe that people, voters, believe they know what they need to know about president obama. they may think he's done a great job of handling the economy, getting us out of the ditch. they may think that he's done a terrible job, in which case they will vote against him. but i think what a tape like this does is just sends people back into their corners and ki
is right outside the door here, and you'll be staying for signing. >> i will. and as a civil servant of the government, i don't receive any royalties, so the price has been set very low, and i hope you all enjoy it. [laughter] >> let's talk a little bit about the idea that these machines have proceeded us to mars. is it still, ultimately, the target to put a human being there? >> for sure. and it's sometimes very surprising if you talk -- all of the scientists i spoke to really want to be there. they, they sense that they need to be there in order to do exploration the way it should be done. and part of it has to do with all those limitations that i talked about. they all want to go in different places. we'd accomplish a lot more with six people than six people standing on a skateboard together. and i think your point, though, about anticipating or preparing has become more and more real. i don't think we understood that so well before mer. that we could for reasonable cost put these rovers in different places around mars and figure out where would we want to go, where should we land
of murdering 12 people, james holmes says he's the victim? his civil rights are being violated? then they voted for obama in 2008. what are they thinking now after last night's debate? frank luntz up next with the fascinating revelation. right back. i've been a superintendent for 30 some years at many different park service units across the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. >> steve: i love being here in the control room. news by the numbers. $127,000. that's the value of all the jewelry swiped from julianne moore's new york city apartment. the heist happened while the actress was filming a movie in canada. next, one dollar a day. that's how much manhattan teen-agers are paid for cell phone have lays. d -- valets. let's them leave their phones inside while they go to school. $5,600, that's how much virginia car dealership accidentally cut from the price of this chevy suv. but when the custo
it might keep people away from the polls. civil rights groups applauded the judge's decision. >> this is a victory today for the people and a loss for those scheming and lying legislators in harrisburg who thought they could hijack the presidential election. >>> the judge could still decide the law can go forward after the presidential election. >>> in other news this morning, american airlines and its pilots' union back at the bargaining table this week after agreeing to reopen contract talks. the pilots rejected american's last offer in august. but now they say they will seek an industry standard contract. meanwhile, american says improperly installed clamps caused rows of seats to come loose on three flights in the last week. the airline is inspecting its planes for similar problems. >>> two scenes of economic recovery this morning including a streak in new car sales. the car of sales and trucks, it rose 13% in the last month compared to a year ago. the last time sales figures were this good february of 2008. small efficient cars are fueling the sales trend. >>> and home p
of unique ways to get at the heart of what they care about. there is a whole history of whether it is civil rights or women's rights or workers' rights and people remember why it was needed to be created in the first place. they do not know they had to work 18 hours and overtime. you got paid a number and you cannot even live in the town where you worked. there is good have to be some kind of evolution and innovation in that movement. there are all kinds of interesting things in the corporate affairs works for the follow resources and create economic development. during the recession, banks were not lending. there were taking their own investment managers and seeking opportunities. that is smart. that is looking at, how can i get economic activity? how can i get a return? i think there is a lot of compelling union out there that are thinking differently about it. to underestimate the kind of political clout that unions have in america, it would not be smart. >> i would say one thing to watch as we go forward, politically, especially from new jersey and east, the unions have different powers
based on civil rights, based on human rights. and he was street treating it as a civil war and against each other and the government war being one of the infraction and that really frustrated syrians. let's end this question now. some of our colleagues would like to chime in with a couple more words. if you promise to be brief. >> i'll be brief. >> i just want to see when you talk about issues of negotiation and peace plans, you have to assume that the other party is civilized. when you have the other party using bombs to hit civilian areas, when you have snipers taking out children in bread lines, this is not a regem you can neglect a peace. this is a regime that has to go. >> i will simply direct you to an interview that the defected prime minister had two days ago in which he said that this was a first time made public that he had gone with the most senator leaders, the regional command to ask for a cease fire and for there to be a political dialogue. they said no way we will negotiate dialogue with the external opposition, know it is the security solution and a security solution al
, we have the worst civil rights violation in mississippi and the correction in the local and state government in mississippi. lives are being hurt. children are being kidnapped. i was very motivated to your mitt romney talk about the first amendment. >> we will get a couple more calls. back to our twitter stream. -- her ee is one this one says -- ours go to a caller on democrat line. go ahead. caller: i am a registered democrat. i am on a fixed income. i worry about our medicare and social security. people are on fixed incomes and depend on social security and medicare. i will vote for mitt romney. i feel that he is the one to straighten out this country and the mess that it is in. i voted for a bomb at of years ago and i am very disappointed in him -- obama four years ago and i am very disappointed in him. >> what made you decide to vote for mitt romney? >> i think he is the only one who could really get us out of this position that we are in. it can go on like this. i am against obama for what he did and taking 4 $5 billion out of our medicare system and putting it into obamacare
be seen again in the history of civilization. climate changes are not imaginary, not theoretical, not based on computer models. it's right there in front of you. >> there is more at bill moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see you here next time. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com de nrns don't wait a week. to get more moyers visit bill moyers.com for exclusive blogs, essays and video features. this episode is available on dvd for $19.95. to order call or write to the address on your screen. funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the coalberg foundation. independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation. a john and poly guf charitable fund. the cle meant foundation. park foundation dedicated to heightening public awareness of public issues. the herb alpert foundation. the bernard and audrey rapoport foundation. the john d. and kathryn t. mcarthur foundation committed to build a more peaceful wor
about if they decide to retry the cases and what about the possibility of civil lawsuits? this could be a lot. >> wow. all right, susan in new york, appreciate it. thank you. >>> new developments today in the shooting that killed a u.s. border patrol agent. the fbi now thinks he may have died by friendly fire. the 30-year-old man was shot and killed this week in arizona. officials initially said he and his colleagues who were wounded in the incident, came under fire after responded to a sensor that went off, but authorities say the only shell casings found at the scene were those belonging to the agents. >> you know, investigators have made progress into the investigation, into agent ivy's death and are looking into the possibility that it was a tragic accident, the result of friendly fire. the fact is the work of the border patrol is dangerous. all of us who wear the uniform know this and yet this special breed of men and women willingly put themselves in harm's way to serve their country and to protect their communities. against those who wish to do us harm. >> that news comes as h
. is it hard? sometimes. is it is agreeable? sometimes. is it the right thing? all the time. i bet if we can get lincoln to come back and we could ask him how hard the civil war was and how hard being president was whether or not he would say to you if it was worth it but i am willing to bet that if you were to ask washington to come back and asked him whether it was leaving the family to fight at valley forge you say it is worth mount vernon to leave to go to the constitutional convention. you would say it is worth it to leave to become president. you would say it is worth it. all of the absentees, all of the day's i think they would say at. i am booker t. washington, frederick douglass, and i keep those around me to remind me what our obligations are. yours and mine. >> the first time i think i heard you you were talking of the declaration of independent which mr. lincoln a alludes to write out of the gate in the gettysburg address. that's 1863 kutz 1776 when you do the math. many quotes from the declaration and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal that is the langua
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)